Camedieval #3

Savannah Pine is a PhD student in medieval history at the University of Cambridge. Her dissertation, titled ‘Chivalric Culture and the Librairie du Louvre’s Textual Community, 1368-1477’, explores chivalry and knightly manhood in late medieval France. She is originally from El Paso, Texas, where she grew up loving, playing, and coaching American football. During the… Read more

Pragmatic & Ceremonial in the Early Middle Ages?

by Samuel Rowe (@SamuelRowe12) Samuel Rowe holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Strasbourg and is reading for an MPhil in Medieval History at the University of Cambridge. Samuel has contributed to the Sigi-AL (sigillography of Alsace) project. His research interests include Romanness in the Early Medieval/Late Antique world and the history of gender… Read more Pragmatic & Ceremonial in the Early Middle Ages?

Why every medieval historian should play Minecraft

by Katie Hawks If you’re a medievalist who games, you’ll be thinking high level things about the interpretation of Vikings in Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, or medievalism and the soundtrack of Witcher 3. If you’re a medievalist who doesn’t game, all this is an alien planet. But computer games can be interesting for us all. We… Read more Why every medieval historian should play Minecraft

The Date of Birth of William of Malmesbury: A Hypothesis

by Liu Ming Liu Ming is a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh (MA and BA at Nanjing University, China) whose thesis project is called ‘The Itinerary of William of Malmesbury: a study of a Benedictine monk’s mobility in the early 12th century’. William of Malmesbury is a famous monk historian in twelfth-century England.… Read more The Date of Birth of William of Malmesbury: A Hypothesis

A New Blog for Relevant Medievalism

Welcome to the revamped, transformed Camedieval blog! Here, the convenors explain the goals of our new platform and make a call for public, relevant, and useful medieval histories.

Querying the Historiography of Disease: an Irish and Welsh Perspective

By Nicholas Thyr, PhD Candidate, Harvard University Last autumn, driven on by some spirit of morbid curiosity, I decided to attend a term-long graduate seminar on the great Plague of Justinian, a series of outbreaks of bubonic plague that swept across Europe, Africa, and the Near East again and again for nearly two hundred years,… Read more Querying the Historiography of Disease: an Irish and Welsh Perspective

Physical distancing from manuscripts and the presence of the digital facsimile

Suzette van Haaren is a PhD student at the University of St Andrews and the University of Groningen. She is writing her dissertation on the effects of digitisation for the reproduction, perception and preservation of medieval manuscripts. Follow her on Twitter @suzettevhaaren. It seems that on my daily rounds of exercise (be they walks or… Read more Physical distancing from manuscripts and the presence of the digital facsimile

Bede’s Source for Bishop Wilfrid: a Hypothesis

By Calum Platts ASNC Graduate Symposium Wilfrid explains the explosion of Northumbrian literature in the early-eighth century. Since Walter Goffart’s discussion of ‘Bede and the Ghost of Bishop Wilfrid’ in The Narrators of Barbarian History, interpretations of Bede’s hagiographical and historical works have been viewed through this lens.[1] A serious concern with Goffart’s theories is… Read more Bede’s Source for Bishop Wilfrid: a Hypothesis

The Medieval Church and the Speech of Birds in Old Norse Literature

By Katie Haley-Halinski ASNC Graduate Symposium ‘A little bird told me’ takes on an entirely new meaning in Old Norse literature, as multiple texts feature a hero who learns vital information from overhearing birds gossiping, or even being addressed directly by a bird. Possibly the most well-known of these heroes is Sigurðr Fáfnisbani. After killing… Read more The Medieval Church and the Speech of Birds in Old Norse Literature

Transforming Creatures, Dialogues and Pseudo-history in Medieval Irish Literature to c. 1300

By Roan Runge ASNC Graduate Symposium Medieval Irish literature abounds in transforming creatures, who inhabit a variety of shapes and follow a variety of narrative paths. Though these stories differ in many ways, they can nevertheless be separated into several rough categories. One of these is the set of transforming figures who transform through multiple… Read more Transforming Creatures, Dialogues and Pseudo-history in Medieval Irish Literature to c. 1300

The Boundaries of Womanhood in Mábilar rímur

By Lee Colwill ASNC Graduate Symposium Mábilar rímur is a fifteenth-century Icelandic poem that describes the adventures of Mábil and her sister Móbil as they attempt to outwit the machinations of their scheming stepmother, Medía. It’s written in the rímur[1] style—a form of long narrative poetry that was immensely popular in Iceland in the fourteenth… Read more The Boundaries of Womanhood in Mábilar rímur

How to Style a Fury’s Hair: Snakes, Venom and Infernal Beings in Irish Classical Adaptations

By Brigid Ehrmantraut ASNC Graduate Symposium Pausanius, in his second-century CE Description of Greece, credits the tradition of representing Furies with snakes in their hair to Aeschylus.[1] In fact, in Aeschylus’s Libation Bearers, Orestes sees the Furies, ‘πεπλεκτανημέναι πυκνοῖς δράκουσιν’ (‘intertwined with constricted snakes’).[2] On some level we should be wary of the description as… Read more How to Style a Fury’s Hair: Snakes, Venom and Infernal Beings in Irish Classical Adaptations

Mirk, Memory and Meditation

By Katherine Dixon Katherine is a PhD student in Medieval/Renaissance literature, with a focus on Medieval literature, at the University of Cambridge’s Faculty of English. You can follow her on Twitter: @ellen_katherine Ian Forrest proposes that, ‘it was by worshipping God in church that the majority of Christians were imagined acting out their faith […]… Read more Mirk, Memory and Meditation

The Problem of Procopius

By Calum Platts ‘The island of Brittia lies in this part of the ocean not far from the coast, being about two hundred stades off and approximately opposite the mouth of the Rhine, and between Britannia and Thule. For while Britain lies to the west about in line with the extreme end of Spain, separated… Read more The Problem of Procopius

Welcome!

The History Faculty at the University of Cambridge offers two workshops for graduate students studying the middle ages to present their research to their colleagues and to receive feedback: the Graduate Early Medieval Seminar (GEMS) and the Central and Late Medieval History workshop (CALM). GEMS and CALM typically met in-person, but due to the current… Read more Welcome!